Supporting Emotions with Aphasia, Webinar 4: Sharing Perspectives Details

Supporting Emotions with Aphasia Webinar 4: Sharing Perspectives

Supporting Emotions with Aphasia Webinar 4: Sharing Perspectives

Registration now open for the fourth webinar in a series of educational events as part of a project supported by funding from the National HSCP Office, submitted by IASLT, AOTI and ISCP jointly, facilitated by IASLT Community of Practice, Supporting Emotions with Aphasia (SEA). The overall project includes webinars and discipline-specific training with the aim of developing an inclusive and interdisciplinary community of practice to provide professional support and to explore ideas for “Supporting Emotions with Aphasia” in clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:

Having attended webinars, participants will be able to:

- Describe the research context and evidence around empirical need for emotional support among people with post-stroke aphasia and other communication impairments; their families, including children, and a documented lack of access to communicatively accessible support in Ireland and elsewhere.
- Understand and learn from a range of disciplinary perspectives on current and ideal service provision in a safe and shared forum.
- Learn about the perspectives of people living with post-stroke aphasia and other communication impairments around the importance of overcoming and managing negative emotional responses as part of learning to live well with their condition; the support needs of their families; and barriers and experiences of accessing relevant support in Ireland.
- Hear from interdisciplinary researchers relating to novel evidence-based treatment approaches that have been adapted in the context of communication impairment.
- Understand the principles of, and rationale for supported conversation training for mental health professionals.
- Learn the principles of, and experiences of teams involved in joint working in the provision of psychosocial support for people with post-stroke communication impairment.
- Learn about opportunities for becoming part of a Community of Practice and benefitting from further collaborative and training events.

About the speakers: 

Professor Frances Horgan
Frances is a physiotherapist and Associate Professor of Physiotherapy at the RCSI University of Medicine & Health Sciences. Her research interests are older person and stroke rehabilitation, health services research, and inter-professional education. She lectures on the undergraduate BSc Physiotherapy and Taught Masters programme in Neurology and Gerontology at RCSI. Frances is a founder member of the Irish Heart Foundation Council on Stroke since 1997 and was Secretary from 1999-2009.

 

Anne O’Loughlin
Anne is Principal Social Worker at the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Dublin. She has worked in a variety of Social Work settings in Ireland, the UK and the US including over 25 years in Paediatric and Adult Rehabilitation. Anne was appointed Adjunct Lecturer/Assistant Professor in UCD School of Social Policy, Social Work & Social Justice. She represents the Irish Association of Social Workers on the National Clinical Programme on Rehabilitation Medicine and the IHF Council on Stroke. Anne was part of the working group which developed the National Rehabilitation Strategy for the provision of Rehabilitation Services, and was also involved in writing the model of care for the National Paediatric Clinical Programme on rehabilitation for children with neurological conditions.

 

Dr Marcia Ward
Marcia is a Principal Specialist Clinical Neuropsychologist working in Cork University Hospital Stroke Services. Her role as a clinical neuropsychologist is to support people to live well with neurological conditions. Marcia has worked therapeutically with people with aphasia for over 12 years. She teaches on a number of University courses. Marcia has published research in the area  of neuropsychological adjustment and she continues to participate in research projects to inform neurorehabilitation practices and services.

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