Developmental Language Disorder

Developmental Language Disorder

Most of us learn language without any problems. It is taken for granted that every child will do so. For some children however, learning to understand and use language does not come naturally. A diagnosis of developmental language disorder (DLD) is made when a child fails to learn language in the typical way¹

Listen to this IASLT DLD podcasts by Dr. Ciara O’Toole

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What might you notice about a child with DLD?

  • Use single words rather than sentences when talking.
  • Make mistakes when pronouncing words and sounds
  • Not follow instructions
  • Not be able to retell a story with all of the information included

  • Avoid putting their hand up in class
  • Have poor listening skills
  • Not be able to contribute verbally in class.
  • Struggle to learn to read.
  • Try to opt out of social situations
  • Homework might be a battle

  • Struggle to keep up with the work
  • Be unhappy in and/or have emotional/behavioural problems
  • Refuse to go to school
  • May not have many friends